Class VI.- Extraordinarily difficult. Paddlers face the constant threat of death because of extreme danger. Navigable only when water levels and conditions are favorable. This violent whitewater should be left to paddlers of Olympic ability. Every safety precaution must be taken.

Severn River Provincial Park Route – Sandy Lake to Fort Severn 650Km

Difficulty ☆☆☆☆☆ 4/5 Distance: 650 KMLength: Three WeeksFeatures: Rapids, Waterfalls, Fast moving, Remote Wilderness The RouteThe river has several deadly rapids and waterfalls with some of the river being over 3km wide. The River splits into two channels, North and South Respectively, and the paddler can choose which to take. Paddle Carefully as their is not much to relax on. DirectionsThe Severn River is the largest River in the Far north of Ontario. Headwaters can be found in a a string of lakes Southwest of Sandy Lake. This is the most common Access point. 

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Turtle River Provincial Park

Difficulty ☆☆☆☆☆ 3/5 Very easy park to Paddle and Navigate. Distance: Distance can vary depending on wind and what route you take to navigate big lakes. Or what Access you start at.Length: 3-12 DaysDepending if you want to just vist the castle, or paddle the whole park. Features: White Otter Castle, Beautiful Clear lakes.  The Route: White Otter Castle Clearwater Lake - Camp Bay - Hawkness Lake - Whiteotter Lake all Via Ann Bay Road  Day 1:   We drove 5.2km up Ann Bay Road. Passing the Bridge and parking above the Hill to the Right.  Do not park before the hill blocking the gate. This is one of many access points you can take. The Portage trail and access is before the bridge on the left. It may help to unload your gear before you park your vehicle. We got in around 10am it was stormy and wet. By the time we…

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Woodland Caribou Provincial Park

DATA Maps, Length Whole Map for Planning Water Class All Types Distance Any Distance Cool Features The Park This wilderness park is a paddler’s paradise offering almost 2,000 km of maintained canoe routes on a myriad of rivers and lakes.Enjoy solitude and commune with nature; Woodland Caribou sees fewer than 1,000 paddlers per season.Two major river systems – the Gammon and Bloodvein flow through the park; Bloodvein River is designated as a Canadian Heritage RiverExcellent fishing for walleye, Northern Pike and Lake Trout and areas with Smallmouth Bass and muskellungePictographs (rock paintings) are located throughout the park and must be treated with respect This undisturbed boreal forest is home to one of the largest groups of woodland caribou south of Hudson Bay.

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